Fats that Help with Weight Loss

Fats are used for energy storage in our bodies, they help with cell regeneration, hormonal regulation, absorption of vitamins A, D and K among others.

About 30% of our daily food intake should consist of fats. But not all fats are good fats. Good fats come from nuts, fish, vegetable oils and fruits, and they are all fine to consume during a diet.

Saturated fats, which become solid at room temperature and are present mainly in meat products should be eaten in moderation and make up for no more than 10% of the total.

More than that can increase cardiovascular risk. You can get this 10% from butter, whole milk and coconut oil.

Unsaturated fats are the most recommended for consumption. A diet made up of unsaturated fats can help lower your bad cholesterol levels, and raise your levels of high density lipoprotein, also known as good cholesterol.

It's quite possible to substitute saturated fats with unsaturated fats on a day-to-day basis.

Some fish, such as salmon, are great sources of good fats, as well as Omega 3.

Another thing to avoid is trans fats (or fatty acids) - those typically occur in small amounts in nature but became widely produced industrially, especially in frying fast foods.

Oils that undergo the process of hydrogenation become hydrogenated fats.

In addition to being the most common in fried foods such as potato chips, it can also be found in biscuits and cakes. This is because it helps in preserving foods, which ends up lasting longer.